Tips + Help


Here's some of my favorite Gluten Free info!

Scroll down to see Baking Substitutions, Weight Conversions, and don't miss the Stevia Substitute Chart and Yeast information. When I find products or great info I will post them here for you.  I am not endorsing any product or idea as this is just for your use and information.

Blessings, Ali

Heal Your Body

Nutritional Recipe Calculator

The Paleo Approach Book by Sarah Ballantyne

16 Ways to Use Your Yogurt Whey

Stevia, Sugar Substitute Chart

Great Tips on using yeast in bread baking

Candida-What is Candidasis?

Practical Paleo Recipes

Leaky Gut Syndrome Information


Fodmaps Information  and on this Site Here
 

Gluten Free Resources

Celiac Disease Foundation (CDF) 

Celiac Sprue Association (CSA) 

Gluten Free Living 

Gluten Intolerance Group

National Foundation for Celiac Awarness 

Living Without Magazine

My Gluten Free Shopping at Amazon (affiliate)

iHerb

Substitutions

Baking powder = 1/3 t. baking soda plus 1/2 t. cream of tartar (equals 1 t. baking powder).

Brown sugar = 1 c. white sugar plus 2 T. molasses, stir well.

Buttermilk = 1 c. milk of choice plus 1 T. vinegar or lemon juice, let set for 5 minutes.

Egg replacer = (for one egg) 1 T. flax or chia meal plus 3 T. hot water, combine and let stand until gelled, or 1/2 a banana, mashed.

Milk = coconut milk, almond milk, or rice milk.

Oil (in baking) = 1/2 to equal amount applesauce or other fruit puree, or plain yogurt.

Powdered sugar = 1 c. granulated sugar plus 1 T. cornstarch, whirl in blender until powder forms.



Wheat or white flour = 2/3 c. gluten-free flour + 1/3 c. gluten-free starch + 1/2 t. guar gum for each cup. 

Powdered milk= use almond meal, finely ground

xanthan gum=use psyllium husk powder

Unsweetened chocolate = 3 T. cocoa for each ounce.


Conversions

~ Liquid ~

2 liters = 1/2 gallon = 2 quarts = 4 pints = 8 cups = 67 1/2 fl. ounces

1 gallon = 4 quarts = 8 pints = 16 cups = 128 fl. ounces

1 quart = 2 pints = 4 cups = 32 fl. ounces

1 pint = 2 cups = 16 fl. ounces

1 cup = 8 fl. ounces

3/4 cup = 6 fl. ounces

1/2 cup = 4 fl. ounces

1/4 cup = 2 fl. ounces

1/8 cup = 1 fl. ounce

1 tablespoon = 0.5 fl. ounce


~ Dry ~

1 cup = 16 tablespoons = 48 teaspoons = 250 ml.

3/4 cup = 12 tablespoons = 36 teaspoons = 175 ml.

2/3 cup = 10 2/3 tablespoons = 32 teaspoons = 150 ml.

1/2 cup = 8 tablepsoons = 24 teaspoons = 125 ml.

1/3 cup = 5 1/3 tablespoons = 16 teaspoons = 75 ml.

1/4 cup = 4 tablespoons = 12 teaspoons = 50 ml.

1/8 cup = 2 tablespoons = 6 teaspoons = 30 ml.

1 tablespoon = 3 teaspoons = 15 ml.

1 teaspoon = 5 ml.

1/2 teaspoon = 2.5 ml.

1/4 teaspoon = 1 ml.

1/8 teaspoon = 0.5 ml.

~ Weight (roughly) ~

1 pound = 16 ounces = 2 cups

3/4 pound = 12 ounces = 1 1/2 cups

2/3 pound = 10 1/2 ounces = about 1 1/3 cups

1/2 pound = 8 ounces = 1 cup

1/3 pound = 5 1/2 ounces = about 2/3 cup

1/4 pound = 4 ounces = 1/2 cup

500 grams = 17 1/2 ounces = about 2 cups

350 grams = 12 ounces = about 1 1/2 cups

226 grams = 8 ounces = about 1 cup

170 grams =  6 ounces = about 3/4 cup

125 grams = 4 1/2 ounces = about 1/2 cup

56 1/2 grams = 2 ounces = about 1/4 cup


Conversion Measurements for Using Different Yeasts in Recipes:


Multiply the amount of instant yeast by 3 for the equivalent amount of fresh yeast.

Multiply the amount of active dry yeast by 2.5 for the equivalent amount of fresh yeast.


Multiply the amount of instant yeast by 1.25 for the equivalent of active dry yeast.




Expiration Date and Testing Yeast:


Expiration Date (printed on the yeast's package) - Yeast does expire. Yeast will last longer than the date printed on the packet if it is kept in the refrigerator. It will last even longer in the freezer (for up to a year or even more).
Testing Yeast - Sugar is used in testing yeast. To test yeast: Add 1/2 teaspoon of sugar to the yeast when stirring it into the water to dissolve. If it foams and bubbles within 10 minutes, you know the yeast is alive and active.

Measuring Yeast:

You do not need to be exact in measuring yeast. Remember it's going to multiply like crazy anyway. A little less is fine; the dough will rise more slowly and may taste better. NOTE: Too much yeast will give an unpleasantly yeasty flavor and aroma.




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Please be advised related products are random and not always gluten-free!